Posts Tagged ‘equipment’

Homemade Wine Making Products List

Ok we talk a lot about diferent prodcts on EasyHomeMadeWine.com.  A lot of people have asked me, “where can I find those for the best price?” Well here you go below is a list of all the products listed on this page, I have excluded Wine Making Bottles intentionally, follow the link to find those.  BTW the links are messed up I’m working on it bare with me for now.

Primary Fermenters/ Aging
Botteling Equipment
Bottels
Measurment Tools
Primary Fermenters/ Aging
Sanitation
Starters
Sweeteners
Yeast
Miscelioneus

Bottling Equipment

5 Gallon Corney Keg Kit 5 Gallon Corny Keg

Amazom.com carries Ball-lock keg systems, they are not cheap I recommend starting with some used equipment and upgrading as you go. Here is a used system that is reasonable priced.


5 Gallon Corney Keg
5 Gallon Corny Keg

Amazom.com carries corny kegs, they add a nice touch to your home made beers as well as your sparkeliing wines and cidars. These corny kegs make botteling a snap they are really nice espically if you don’t want to deal with botteling.

Measurement Tools

5 Gallon Glass Carboy5 Gallon Glass Carboy

Amazom.com has lots of 5 Gallon Glass Carboys, they are nice for every thing from the primary fermenting to racking or even aging.

 

Sanitation

Starter

PYREX® 500mL Erlenmeyer Flask

PYREX® 500mL Erlenmeyer Flask

These are great for making starters. You can put then right on the stove to achieve desired temp and then put on a stopper and vapor lock.

Sweetener

Yeast

Lalvin 71B-1122 Yeast

Lalvin 71B-1122 Yeast

Lavin high quality dry yeast packet. Recommended uses:Blush, Whites, Nouveau, Young Reds & Juice from Concentrates. Fast fermenting, produces up to 14% alcohol.

Lalvin K1-V1116 Yeast

Lalvin K1-V1116 Yeast

Lavin high quality dry yeast packet. Recommended uses:Whites, Fruit wines, Concentrates, Stuck Fermentations & Cider. Fast fermenting, produces up to 18% alcohol.

Lalvin EC-1118 Yeast

Lalvin EC-1118 Yeast

Lavin high quality dry yeast packet. Recommended uses:Champagne,Dry Meads,Late Harvest, Secondary & Stuck Fermentations. VERY fast fermenting, produces up to 18% alcohol.

Miscellaneous

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Glass, Plastic or Bucket

As a new comer to homemade wine making I have to decide what I want to do my primary fermenting in.  There are a few options, the title tells the tale.  As homemade wine makers we all will face this quandary at somepoint. I am going to try to give you some information to help with your own decision making. So are the options: Glass Carboy, Plastic Carboy or Bucket.

Glass:

They have been using glass carboys to make homemade wine for ever, here are some of the pros and cons

Pros:

  • Durable- they should last about forever
  • Heat resistant-You can pour boining water right in them
  • Won’t stain-Dark juices can sit in them with no worries
  • See through, you know whats going on when you use Glass carboys
  • Sturdy

Cons:

  • Glass is heavy, and so are glass carboys, they weigh in at about 25 lbs
  • No handle, but you can purchase a wide array of carriers
  • While they are relatively durable don’t drop them. Glass carboys can chip or crack
  • They are the most expensive option epically if you plan on having your Carboy shipped
  • Narrow opening makes filling and cleaning a challange

Plastic Carboys

Better bottle makes the best ones I have seen, they are very similar to glass.  From what I have been told you can use and 5 gallon jug from your office water cooler to make your home made wines.

Pros:

  • Durable- they should last about forever and most are scratch resistant
  • Won’t stain-Dark juices can sit in them with no worries
  • See through, you know whats going on when you use plastic carboys
  • Very Light they weigh only 1.5 lbs
  • Sturdy

Cons:

  • No handle, but you can purchase a wide array of carriers
  • Cant pour boiling water in them, I have seen plastic carboys melt!! The good ones are rated to 140º F
  • While they are not as expensive as glass carboys, plastic carboys are still not cheap
  • Narrow opening makes filling and cleaning a challange

Primairy fermenting bucket

These buckets are sold allover the place and are great for anyone looking to make homemade wine.

Pros:

  • Durable- they should last about forever and most are scratch resistant
  • If price is your game then primary fermenting buckets are for you! usually you can get the whole kit for under 15 bucks
  • Sturdy, I have seen 5 full buckets stacked.
  • Easy to store, they fit in side each other. Lets be honest though, as soon as I empty mine I fill them up 🙂
  • Nice wide opening makes filling and mixing easy

Cons:

  • Cant pour boiling water in them, I have seen primary fermenting buckets melt!! The good ones are rated to 140º F
  • Primary fermenting buckets will stain from dark juices
  • Since you can’t se through them who knows what is going on

Ok, so there was a fourth option, other. My first batch of homemade wine was in a milk jug, this was good because I could kind of see what was going on in there and it was cheap and easy. That suits me because I’m not a patient person not to mention I’m learning as I go here. but as you may or may not know milk jugs are not totally see through. The next batch of homemade wine I did was some more mead, this time in a bucket the  primary fermenting bucket was chosen because they are really cheap. the down side is that I think I ruined the started and since the bucket is opaque I have no clue what the heck is going on in there. Well I may have used a milk jug, if your even remotely serious about making homemade wine, then this isn’t that great of an option. Let me reccomed a a 1 gallon glass jug as a good alternative for small homemade wine batches and experimentation.

I’ll leave you with this, there is there is no right or wrong answer. What ever you use, happy fermenting!